Next: Chocolate

Here’s Sara’s take on the Slow Food banquet, and your invitation to our next event.

It will be Tuesday evening, Feb 5, at Cheesetopia in Camp Hill — 2201 Market Street.

Beginning at 5.m., master artisan chocolatier Frederic Loraschi will offer bonbons, chocolate truffles and hot chocolate, and talk about creating incredible edible art. A native of France, he is known for his chocolate and sugar sculpure, and most recently was executive pastry chef at the Circular Dining Room of The Hotel Hershey.

Loraschi started his pastry …
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Missed you. How’s it going?

What I like about blogs is you can let ’em be and come back and BAM! They’re still there.

Slow Food Harrisburg dinner was very cool, and Sara writes about it Thursday in the P-N Go section. Will link when it’s up. Best part for us was the three cheesemakers getting up and talking about their farms. The Amish guy told a joke — who knew there were Amish jokes?

If one sheep jumps the fence, how many sheep are left?

None.

Whoa. That’s sheep for you. We had sheep and cow and goat cheese, a great dinner prepared and presented by the culinary students at HACC, good wine and some hearty propaganda from the Pennsylvania Farmstead and Artisan Cheese Alliance.

The next day, Dee and I set out for the new farm market in downtown Carlisle. It’s called the Carlisle Central Farmers Market, smack in the middle of Pennsylvania’s best soil.

This is a small space, though it might be bigger in the summer. It took us 15 seconds to find Keswick Creamery and Otterbein Acres, two of the three cheesemakers from the previous night, tucked into a small space with Painted Hand Farm. We bought cheese — crucial, because we always seem to run out midweek — and some ground goat.

I have loved goats since we went to dinner at the Browns’ farm in upper Dauphin county about 20 years ago. The goats leaned against the barn and watched us. They were just animals who liked to lean up against something. They made me happy. Now I get my goat fix from the farm near us at the bottom of Pleasant Drive, where about 60 goats roam the pasture in season.

Loving, honoring and eating animals are tough and constant choices in the omnivore world, so i t Thought I’d try goat chili. I put the goat into my standard chile recipe and … it really liked the seasoning. In a good way, it sorta multiplied the chipotle.

Try some goat. It will put hair on your chest. If, you know, you want some. But cut back a little on the seasoning.

Missed you. How’s it going?

What I like about blogs is you can let ’em be and come back and BAM! They’re still there.

Slow Food Harrisburg dinner was very cool, and Sara writes about it Thursday in the P-N Go section. Will link when it’s up. Best part for us was the three cheesemakers getting up and talking about their farms. The Amish guy told a joke — who knew there were Amish jokes?

If one sheep jumps the fence, how many sheep are left?

None.

Whoa. That’s sheep for you. We had sheep and cow and goat cheese, a great dinner prepared and presented by the culinary students at HACC, good wine and some hearty propaganda from the Pennsylvania Farmstead and Artisan Cheese Alliance.

The next day, Dee and I set out for the new farm market in downtown Carlisle. It’s called the Carlisle Central Farmers Market, smack in the middle of Pennsylvania’s best soil.

This is a small space, though it might be bigger in the summer. It took us 15 seconds to find Keswick Creamery and Otterbein Acres, two of the three cheesemakers from the previous night, tucked into a small space with Painted Hand Farm. We bought cheese — crucial, because we always seem to run out midweek — and some ground goat.

I have loved goats since we went to dinner at the Browns’ farm in upper Dauphin county about 20 years ago. The goats leaned against the barn and watched us. They were just animals who liked to lean up against something. They made me happy. Now I get my goat fix from the farm near us at the bottom of Pleasant Drive, where about 60 goats roam the pasture in season.

Loving, honoring and eating animals are tough and constant choices in the omnivore world, so i t Thought I’d try goat chili. I put the goat into my standard chile recipe and … it really liked the seasoning. In a good way, it sorta multiplied the chipotle.

Try some goat. It will put hair on your chest. If, you know, you want some. But cut back a little on the seasoning.

Chef Showdown

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Bame left, Wallace right

Curiel Bame, the chef who helped bring ceviche to Pittsburgh, will go against Chef Richard Wallace, executive chef at the Old Corner Hotel in Williamsport, on Thursday at 11 a.m. in the Best Chef of Pennsylvania semifinals.

Bame, exec chef at Pittsburgh’s Seviche, told the Pittsburgh Tribune Review that his signature dish, popular in Miami’s South Beach area, is one he’s always enjoyed. “I ate it for lunch when I was a kid,” Bame said. “My mother was Mexican, so I grew up with it.”

Ceviche is a way of sort of cooking raw fish in acidic lemon or lime juice — making for a light citrus flavor, as opposed to sushi’s sometimes soy-sauce laden wrapping.

Wallace, who defeated Stock’s on 2nd executive chef James Woltman in the quarterfinals, originally won his regional competition by impressing the judges “with his creative use of flavor and attention to detail.”

At 1:30 …

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Best Chefs

Executive Chef James Woltman of Stock’s on 2nd will challenge for the Best Chef in PA title next week, along with regional winners from across the state at the Pennsylvania Farm Show.

Last year’s winner, Chef Michael Adams of the Farmhouse Restaurant in Emmaus, will defend in competition that begins Wednesday, January 9. Random pairings of the eight chefs who won regional competitions in 2007 will kick off the cooking at 11 a.m. Three more rounds will follow at 90-minute intervals, all on the Culinary Connection Stage.

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The Semi-Final rounds will be …

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